Before the 18th century, Aligarh was known as Kol or Koil. 
The name Kol covers not only the city but the entire district though its geographical extent varies from time to time. The origin of the name is unclear. In some ancient texts, Kol is considered to be the name of a tribe or caste, the name of a place or mountain, and the name of a sage or demon. From a study of the district's place-names, it appears that the district was once quite well covered by forest, ghats and groves. The early history of the district through the 12th century AD is unclear. According to Edwin T. Atkinson, the name of Kol was given to the city by Balarama, who killed the great Asura (demon) Kola and with the help of the Ahirs subdued this part of the Doab. In another account, Atkinson tells "legend" that Kol was founded in AD 372 by Rajputs of the Dor tribe. This old fort, Dor Fort, now in ruins,

Shortly before the Muslim invasion, Kol was held by the Dor Rajputs and at the time of Mahmud of Ghazni the chief of Dor was the Haratta of Baran. There is a reason to believe that Koel was once the seat of a Buddhist community because Buddha statues and other Buddhist relics have been found in excavations found in the prestige on which Koil's citadel stood. It also contained Hindu relics indicating that the successors in all likelihood included a Buddhist and a Hindu temple. In 1194 AD, Qutb-ud-din Aybak moved from Delhi to Koil, one of the "most celebrated forts of Hind". Was. Qutb-ud-din Ayub appointed Hisam-ud-din Ulbak as the first Muslim governor of Koil. Koil is also mentioned in Ibn Battuta's Rihla, When accompanied by Ibn Battuta in 1541 accompanied by 15 ambassadors representing the Mongol emperor Ukhontu Khan of the Yuan dynasty of China, in 1341 traveled to the city of Koil on the coast of Cambay (in Gujarat). Ibn Battuta, it appears that the district was in a very troubled state when the escort of the emperor's embassy helped relieve Jalali from the invading body of Hindus and lost one of his officers in the fighting. Ibn Battuta called Koil "a fine city surrounded by mango groves". It is from such groves that Koil's surroundings may have acquired the name of Sabjaabad or "the green country". Jahangir had gone to Kol on a hunting expedition. Jahangir clearly mentions the forest of Kol, where he killed the wolves. The district appears to have been in a very troubled state when the escort of the emperor's embassy helped relieve Jalali from the invading body of Hindus and lost one of his officers in the fighting. Ibn Battuta called Koil "a fine city surrounded by mango groves". It is from such groves that Koil's surroundings may have acquired the name of Sabzabad or "green country". Jahangir had gone to Kol on a hunting expedition. Jahangir clearly mentions the forest of Kol, where he killed the wolves. The district appears to have been in a very troubled state when the escort of the emperor's embassy helped relieve Jalali from the invading body of Hindus and lost one of his officers in the fighting. Ibn Battuta called Koil "a fine city surrounded by mango groves". It is from such groves that Koil's surroundings may have acquired the name of Sabzabad or "the green country". Jahangir had gone to Kol on a hunting expedition. Jahangir clearly mentions the forest of Kol, where he killed the wolves.

At the time of Ibrahim Lodhi, Umar's son Muhammad was governor of Kol, built a fort at Kol and named the city after Muhammadgarh in 1524–25; And Sabit Khan, the governor of the region at the time of Farrukh Siyar and Muhammad Shah, rebuilt the old Lodi fort and named the city after his name, Sabatgarh. The ruler of Koil was the Burgujar Raja Rao Bahadur Singh, whose ancestors ruled from AD 1184 after the marriage of Raja Pratap Singh Bargajar, daughter of Koil Ajit Singh. Jat ruler Surajmal and Muslim forces captured the fort of Koil in 1753 with protection from Jai Singh of Jaipur, Bargujar Raja Bahadur Singh continued to fight under him from another fort which became known as the "Battle of Ghosar". She goes. It was named Ramgarh and eventually, when Shia commander Najaf Khan captured Kol, he gave it the present name of Aligarh. Aligarh Fort (also called Aligarh Fort),

Establishment of Aligarh Muslim University (1875):- In 1875, Sir Syed Ahmed Khan founded the Muhammadan Anglo Oriental College in Aligarh and patterned the college after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge that he had visited on his trip to England. Later it became Aligarh Muslim University in 1920.

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